Annette Nassuth

Associate Professor College of Biological Science Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology Guelph, Ontario anassuth@uoguelph.ca Office: (519) 824-4120 ext. 58787

Bio/Research

My research group investigates biotic and abiotics stress on plants at the cellular and sub-cellular biochemical and molecular levels. The objective is to identify what changes occur in plant cells upon exposure to stress and which of these changes aid the plant to increase its tolerance to the s...

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Bio/Research

My research group investigates biotic and abiotics stress on plants at the cellular and sub-cellular biochemical and molecular levels. The objective is to identify what changes occur in plant cells upon exposure to stress and which of these changes aid the plant to increase its tolerance to the stress.

A major focus is the investigation of stress tolerance in grapevines. Winters in Ontario can cause substantial damage to the cultivated grapes used in the Wine Industry, whereas wild grapes have no problems. We try to find out what the molecular basis is for this phenomenon. In particular, what genes switch "on" or "off" and what is different between these genes in the different grapes or other members of the Vitaceae family? The goal is to use this knowledge to improve freezing and drought stress tolerance in the cultivated grapes I am a member of the Guelph Grape and Wine Research Group.

A second focus is on plant-virus interactions. My lab has developed and optimized molecular-based techniques for the early and reliable detection of viruses in several plants, including grapes and tomatoes. The presence of a virus is often not visible because the virus can be present in a latent state or shows symptoms only in certain tissues (e.g. fruits). Such tests are of special interest to the Horticulture Industry, for the control of viral disease, and to the Centre of Plant Health, for the certification of plants for import and export purposes. We investigate the defence reactions of the plant, such as silencing, and how one might use such defence reactions to produce virus-resistant or virus-tolerant plants.


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Lori Bona Hunt
l.hunt@exec.uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 ext. 53338