Kate Parizeau

Assistant Professor College of Social & Applied Human Sciences Department of Geography Guelph, Ontario kparizea@uoguelph.ca Office: (519) 824-4120 ext. 52174

Bio/Research

My research uses waste management practices as a lens through which to interrogate complex systems of social organization and human exchanges with the natural world. This focus allows me to engage issues of social justice, environmental sustainability, and urban systems management. My most recent...

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Bio/Research

My research uses waste management practices as a lens through which to interrogate complex systems of social organization and human exchanges with the natural world. This focus allows me to engage issues of social justice, environmental sustainability, and urban systems management. My most recent research projects have investigated the lives and work of the cartoneros of Buenos Aires, Argentina – urban informal recyclers who sort through curbside trash to make their living. My studies focus on these workers’ health, socio-economic status, and access to social resources, drawing on their experiences in order to investigate the economic, political, and spatial rationalities that encourage and maintain high levels of social inequality in a modern city.

My research interests are centred on the following three interrelated themes:

Social difference, informality, and urban inequality

My studies of informal sector work (particularly in Latin America) seek to describe the ways in which gender, racialization, and socioeconomic status play out in uneven urban landscapes.

Value and waste

I am also interested in investigating the ways that ‘filth’ and environmental contamination can affect a commodity’s life course, and also how the socio-cultural values of waste and dirt adhere to the people associated with such commodities either through their work or other types of proximity.

A ‘brown agenda’ of environmental sustainability

The third theme of my research interests pertains to the ‘brown agenda’ of environmental issues, including the provision of sanitation services and other environmental health matters arising from human urban development. This research interest is based in a recognition that exposure to environmental dangers are usually not evenly distributed in society, but often follow gradients of social and spatial inequality.


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Links

Media Relations

Lori Bona Hunt
l.hunt@exec.uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 ext. 53338

Kevin Gonsalves
kgonsalves@uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 ext. 56982