Smaro Kamboureli

Professor College of Arts School of English and Theatre Studies Guelph, Ontario smaro@uoguelph.ca Office: (519) 824-4120 ext. 53251

Bio/Research

Smaro Kamboureli is a Professor at the School of English and Theatre Studies (SETS­­), University of Guelph, and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Critical Studies in Canadian Literature. Before joining the University of Guelph in August 2004, she taught for many years at the University of Victor...

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Bio/Research

Smaro Kamboureli is a Professor at the School of English and Theatre Studies (SETS­­), University of Guelph, and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Critical Studies in Canadian Literature. Before joining the University of Guelph in August 2004, she taught for many years at the University of Victoria where she served as Director of the English graduate program and as the first Associate Dean—Research in the Humanities. A guest professor in Germany and India and the recipient of various research grants, she has lectured widely in Canada and overseas. Her publications include: in the second person (Longspoon 1985), a long prose poem that has been translated into Italian by Clara Antonucci, with a critical introduction by Eleonora Rao, in seconda persona (Palomar 2007); A Mazing Space: Writing Canadian Women Writing, co-edited with Shirley Neuman (NeWest 1986); On the Edge of Genre: The Contemporary Canadian Long Poem (University of Toronto Press 1991); and Scandalous Bodies: Diasporic Literature in English Canada (Oxford 2000), which received the Gabrielle Roy Prize for Canadian Criticism. Scandalous Bodies, with a Foreword by Imre Szeman, will be reprinted by Wilfrid Laurier UP in 2009. She has published two editions, with critical introductions, of an anthology of multicultural writing in English Canada, Making a Difference: Canadian Multicultural Literature and Making a Difference: Multicultural Literatures in English Canada (Oxford 1996 and 2006 respectively). On the Board of NeWest Press (Edmonton) and one of its in-house editors since 1981, she is the founder and editor of its series “The Writer as Critic”. Di Brandt's So This Is the World & Here I Am in It (2007) is the tenth volume in the series, with My Beloved Wager by Erin Mouré forthcoming in 2009; other recent titles in that series include Daphne Marlatt's Readings from the Labyrinth and Fred Wah's Faking It: Poetics and Hybridity. She has also edited Roy K. Kiyooka's posthumous Pacific Rim Letters, with an Afterword, and reissued, with corrections, his Transcanada Letters (both NeWest 2005). Her most recent book is Trans.Can.Lit: Resituating the Study of Canadian Literature (Wilfrid Laurier UP 2007), which she co-edited with Roy Miki. Trans.Can.Lit is the first volume in the new TransCanada series of books she has launched as the General Editor with Wilfrid Laurier UP. With Roy Miki, and working with other colleagues as well as students, she organized the first two TransCanada: Literature, Institutions, Citizenship conferences, and she is organizing, along with Christl Verduyn, TransCanada Three that will take place at Mount Allison University, July 16-19, 2009. She has just completed editing the first collection of selected essays by Barbara Godard, Canadian Literature at the Crossroads of Language and Culture (NeWest, fall 2008). The Culture of Research: Retooling the Humanities, a collection of essays she has co-edited with Daniel Coleman, is under consideration for publication. She has also published many essays and chapters in books. Smaro is also the guest editor of a TransCanada special issue on Canadian literature, forthcoming in Canadian Literature, and guest co-editor, with Heike Härting, of "Discourses of Security, 'Peacekeeping,' and the Canadian Cultural Imagination," forthcoming in University of Toronto Quarterly. Her primary research interests include the study of Canadian literature, especially in the contexts of diaspora, multiculturalism, postcolonialism, racialization, globalization, institutional structures, and the cultural industries; theories of diaspora, life-writing, gender, and the long poem; inter/disciplinary studies and theories of pedagogy; and the study of the humanities and universities. She is currently at work on a study of diaspora and Canadian literature, and has just started to investigate humanitarian narratives and their politics of representation. Committed to both undergraduate and graduate teaching, she considers mentoring outside the classroom to be an essential aspect of her pedagogy. TransCanada Institute, which she founded with the support of a Canada Foundation for Innovation grant and her Canada Research Chair position in 2006, is a hub of intellectual and cultural activities that afford the students working under her supervision the opportunity to interact with guest speakers and artists; it also offers students a convivial space of work that fosters intellectual stimulation and provides opportunities for funding, collaboration, and professionalization.

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Media Relations

Lori Bona Hunt
l.hunt@exec.uoguelph.ca
519-824-4120 ext. 53338